Auto Accident Law in Michigan

Every state in the union follows its own regulations and laws when it comes to personal injury caused by a car accident. The tremendous quantity of knowledge that is required to fully understand auto accident law in Michigan can be overwhelming. The path to a generous settlement after a major auto accident is complicated by a number of these laws. If you've been severely injured by a car accident in Michigan, comprehending these laws is key.

What Does No-Fault Mean?

A no-fault state is one in which the insurance company that insures a person in the state is required to pay for a person's medical bills, cover their lost wages, and reimburse others for damaged property. Auto accident law in Michigan declares it as a no-fault state. The tradeoff for living in a no fault state is that while you're guaranteed money from the insurance company, you cannot seek damage against another driver, even if they were negligent. An exception is made for particularly serious injuries caused by an auto accident.

Proportional Comparative Fault

If the medical bills and lost wages are much more than your insurance policy can handle, you may be entitled to sue another party for damages. However, you are still banned from filing a lawsuit if you are found to be more than 50% at fault for the accident in question. This is a result of auto accident law in Michigan including a Proportional Comparative Fault rule. The purpose of this law is to prevent defendants from having to pay a person who is just as responsible for their injuries as the defendant.

The Statute of Limitations in Michigan

If you were unaware of your rights after a serious injury from a car accident, you may still be able to file a lawsuit if another party's negligence was the cause. Under auto accident law in Michigan, you have up to 3 years to file a lawsuit for a personal injury. In cases where an injury wasn't immediately apparent, you have 3 years from the date you discover the injury to file suit.

In any auto accident where a serious injury or death has occurred, it is recommended to contact a lawyer. These cases will often need to go to court, and that's when you want someone well versed in auto accident law in Michigan on your side. If another person's negligence has left you unable to work or permanently disfigured, you deserve compensation - which you most likely won't be able to get without the help of an attorney.

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