Disability in Montana

In Montana, there are two different types of disability.  Both use the same criteria to determine if you are eligible for benefits.  The first, Social Security Disability Insurance, pays you monthly for serious physical or mental disabilities.  The second, Supplemental Security Income, is based on need and provides funds for individuals with a monthly income below a certain amount.

Eligibility Requirements

There are a number of different factors that affect your disability eligibility.  They include the following:

  1. how long you’ve worked at your job;
  2. how recently you left your job;
  3. how old you are;
  4. if you’re applying for a family member, you must list your relationship to that person.

 

A physician and disability specialist will then look over this information and your specific case information, including all medical reports.  They will then decide if you qualify for disability and, if you do, which form of disability you will receive.

To make the entire process faster, give the disability specialist as much information as you can, including all your medical reports, lab results, doctor’s contact information, and all of your employer’s information.  However, even if you don’t have all of this information at your fingertips, it’s still a good idea to go ahead and file your disability claim.  The sooner you file your claim, the quicker it will get into the system.

Note that you may be required to go to a consultative examination if your medical records are not as detailed as needed.  You will not have to pay for this—Social Security will pay for any additional examinations or tests needed to decide if you are disabled.  In most cases, they will also pay for any travel expenses you occur while going to and from this exam.

How To Apply?

When you go to the Social Security office to apply for disability, you’ll be asked five basic questions.  First, are you making more than $700 a month?  If yes, you probably don’t qualify for disability.  Second, is your condition going to interfere with normal, basic job activities?  Third, is your condition on the official list of impairments (this list can be obtained from the Social Security office)?  Fourth, can you do the job you previously did?  And finally, can you work anywhere else?  Answering  these questions will determine if you should continue your disability claim.

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